travel budget review

 

Sunday, September 04, 2005

About Monterrey, Mexico

 


City of Mountains
Monterrey is located in the northern part of Mexico, about 150 miles from the U.S. border in Texas. It is the capital city of the state of Nuevo Leon and Mexico's third largest city, with a population of about 1.2 million.
The city is surrounded by the Sierra Madre mountains at an elevation of 200 feet above sea level. The mountain view is spectacular. The mountain view is dominated by the distinctive Cerro de la Silla, a saddle-shaped peak, which has become a symbol of Monterrey.
Monterrey is Mexico's top industrial center. More goods are produced here than in any other Mexican city. It is estimated that the city accounts for about 25 percent of Mexico's total manufacturing base.
It is also a very modern city, although many colonial buidings have been preserved.
Attractions for Visitors
Gran Plaza
In the strikingly modern downtown area is located one of the largest plazas in the world, with 40 hectares of buildings, walkways, esplanades, fountains and gardens. The plaza is the focal point for restaurants, shops, major hotels, and also hosts the most important public buildings. In the center of the plaza stands the city's symbol, El Faro del Comercio - "The Lighthouse of Commerce."
Mexican History Museum
Located in the center of the city, this excellent museum gives you an overview of the Mexican Colonial Period and Modern Mexico. The museum's exhibits are arranged chronologically, moving from presentations on Ancient Mexico, through Colonial times to Modern Mexico. This museum is a good place to learn about Mexico's history.
Garcia Caves
Located close to Monterrey are a series of spectacular and dramatic caves dating back more than 60 million years ago.The caves are located halfway up a steep rocky cliff and may be accessed by an authentic turn-of-the-century cable car. Guided tours of the caves are available.
Bioparque Estrella
Not far from Monterrey is a 250-hectare wildlife park featuring a drive-through safari where visitors can drive 7 kms and view more than 600 animals from 40 different species that now live and procreate in the park. Among the species are ostriches, giraffes, zebras, red deer, monkeys, black buck water buck, orixes, axis, silks, hippopotamus, camels, kangaroos and lambs. The park also has a separate zoo area where children can interact with different animal species.
Pastora Park
Located in one of the city's main green areas is a calm and beautifully maintained park in which the people of Monterrey go to relax and spend a pleasant day. The park has a natural lake where you can row a boat, a replica of a small typical Mexican town, and a zoo. There are gardens, ponds and waterfalls, and several facilities to hold get-togethers or picnics. There are also several restaurants and souvenir shops located in the park area.

Health Information For Mexico Visitors

 


Vaccines All travelers to Mexico or Central America (particularly those who will be traveling with young children) should consult their physician several weeks before departing. Depending upon your itinerary, medical history, age (and other factors), your doctor may recommend that you receive vaccinations for the following diseases:
# Hepatitis A # Hepatitis B # Rabies # Typhoid Fever # Yellow Fever
During your visit to the doctor, routine immunizations, such as those that protect against tetanus or diphtheria, should be updated, if necessary.
Travelers' Diarrhea Travelers' diarrhea is the most common ailment afflicting visitors to Mexico and Central America.
Travelers' diarrhea is caused by certain bacteria which contaminate food and water and is very common in this area of the world. All travelers should bring along an anti-diarrhea drug (such as diphenoxylate) to be taken at the onset of significant diarrhea (three or more loose stools in an 8 hour period). If the diarrhea continues for more than 2 or 3 days, medical attention should be sought. To minimize the risk of diarrhea, do not drink tap water, unbottled beverages or drinks with ice. Also, avoid raw vegetables, unpasteurized milk and raw or undercooked poultry, fish or meat.
Malaria Malaria is an infection spread by mosquitos which, if left untreated, can be fatal. Malaria can be prevented by taking prescription antimalarial drugs (such as choloroquine) and by taking measures to protect yourself against mosquito bites. The risk of malaria is highest in certain of the rural areas of the countries in this region . Antimalarial drugs are not normally recommended for visitors who confine their stay to the major resort areas on the Gulf and Pacific Coasts (e.g. Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta).
Prescription Drugs If you are taking any prescription drugs, ensure that you pack (in your hand luggage) a sufficient supply of these in their original, labelled containers. If you have a history of significant medical problems, wearing a medical alert bracelet while on your trip is a good idea.
Medical Insurance Check whether your current health insurance covers you for medical expenses incurred abroad. If not, the purchase of a travel health insurance policy is highly recommended to avoid the risk of you incurring substantial medical expenses in the event of illness or injury while on your vacation.
Animal Bites If, during your trip, you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other animal, promptly clean the wound thoroughly with soap and water and seek medical attention immediately - whether or not you have been immunized against rabies.
Insect Repellent If you are travelling to an area where insects may be a problem, bring along a supply of insect repellent and apply it to your clothing and exposed skin before venturing outdoors.
Sun Block The sun can be very hot in this area of the world and a bad sunburn will spoil your vacation. Make sure you bring along an adequate supply of a good quality sun block or sun screen lotion and use it frequently. A sun hat is also recommended.

health information for visitor to mexico

 


Vaccines All travelers to Mexico or Central America (particularly those who will be traveling with young children) should consult their physician several weeks before departing. Depending upon your itinerary, medical history, age (and other factors), your doctor may recommend that you receive vaccinations for the following diseases:
# Hepatitis A # Hepatitis B # Rabies # Typhoid Fever # Yellow Fever
During your visit to the doctor, routine immunizations, such as those that protect against tetanus or diphtheria, should be updated, if necessary.
Travelers' Diarrhea Travelers' diarrhea is the most common ailment afflicting visitors to Mexico and Central America.
Travelers' diarrhea is caused by certain bacteria which contaminate food and water and is very common in this area of the world. All travelers should bring along an anti-diarrhea drug (such as diphenoxylate) to be taken at the onset of significant diarrhea (three or more loose stools in an 8 hour period). If the diarrhea continues for more than 2 or 3 days, medical attention should be sought. To minimize the risk of diarrhea, do not drink tap water, unbottled beverages or drinks with ice. Also, avoid raw vegetables, unpasteurized milk and raw or undercooked poultry, fish or meat.
Malaria Malaria is an infection spread by mosquitos which, if left untreated, can be fatal. Malaria can be prevented by taking prescription antimalarial drugs (such as choloroquine) and by taking measures to protect yourself against mosquito bites. The risk of malaria is highest in certain of the rural areas of the countries in this region . Antimalarial drugs are not normally recommended for visitors who confine their stay to the major resort areas on the Gulf and Pacific Coasts (e.g. Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta).
Prescription Drugs If you are taking any prescription drugs, ensure that you pack (in your hand luggage) a sufficient supply of these in their original, labelled containers. If you have a history of significant medical problems, wearing a medical alert bracelet while on your trip is a good idea.
Medical Insurance Check whether your current health insurance covers you for medical expenses incurred abroad. If not, the purchase of a travel health insurance policy is highly recommended to avoid the risk of you incurring substantial medical expenses in the event of illness or injury while on your vacation.
Animal Bites If, during your trip, you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other animal, promptly clean the wound thoroughly with soap and water and seek medical attention immediately - whether or not you have been immunized against rabies.
Insect Repellent If you are travelling to an area where insects may be a problem, bring along a supply of insect repellent and apply it to your clothing and exposed skin before venturing outdoors.
Sun Block The sun can be very hot in this area of the world and a bad sunburn will spoil your vacation. Make sure you bring along an adequate supply of a good quality sun block or sun screen lotion and use it frequently. A sun hat is also recommended.