travel budget review

 

Thursday, September 01, 2005

More thing you can do in China(part03)

 


The Number Seven Thing to Do: Visit Kong Miao - the Temple of Confucius
Kong Miao is now the Capital Museum and houses a display on the culture and history of Beijing. Confucianius was born in Qufu, China. The temple in Beijing is among the largest Confucian temples outside Qufu. Communism views Confucism in a dim light; Confucian philosophy was the worldview of Chinese feudalism.
The Temple's main hall houses musical instruments that were important for Confucian ceremonies. The temple also contains 198 stone tables inscribed with the names of those individuals who passed the test to become a Mandarin during the Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties: 51,624 names.
The Imperial Academy sits next to the Temple. The Academy was founded in 1306. The Academy taught language and martial arts.
In 1462 it had 13,000 students. Today the Academy is the Capital Library, which houses collections on the social sciences and on local history.
The Number Eight Thing to Do: Visit the Lama Temple
The Lama Temple is Beijing's largest and best known temple. The Temple was built in 1694. During the annual Spring Festival the Temple stages a public presentation of the Devil Dance, which is supposed to teach observers not to fall to anger, greed, wine, and other evils.
The Lama Temple is part of the Yellow Hat Sect of Tibetan Buddhism. It managed to survive China's Cultural Revolution through the protection of Chinese President Zhou Enlai. The temple did well in pre-Community Beijing in part because the Manchu Qing emperors, though officially Confucians, were attracted to Lamanistic Buddhism.
Among its several attractions, the Temple's Hall of the Wheel of Dharma is home to a 20 foot statue of Tsongkhapa, the founder of the Yellow Hat Sect....
The Number Nine Thing to Do: Visit Beihai Gongyuan (North Lake Park)
The lake area is one of the most beautiful parts of Beijing. Kublai Khan ruled the Mongol Yuan Dynasty's empire from Jade Island on the lake here. Marco Polo visited the spot. The lake is covered with boats in the summer, ice skaters in the winter. There are a number of buildings on the island; among the more important: the Temple of Eternal Peace, the Hall of the Wheel of Law, the Hall of Universal Peace, the Hall of Ripples, and the White Dagoba.
The White Dagoba is a Tibetan styled temple built for the 5th Dalai Lama upon his visit to Beijing in 1651. The Hall of Ripples contains a restaurant which was started by the Emperor's chef in 1926 -- after he was no longer the emperor's chef because there was no longer an emperor....
The Number Ten Thing to Do: See Tiantan - the Temple of Heaven
Among the city's most visited parks. The Temple's complex covers an area of close to 700 acres. The complex has two groups of buildings: the northern group is set in a half circle and represents heaven; the southern group is square, representing earth. At the center of the northern group is one of China's most impressive buildings - the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests.
Like the Imperial Palace, the Temple of Heaven dates back the era when the Ming Dynasty reestablished Beijing as China's capital. Ming and Qing emperors came to the Temple at the Winter Solstice to honor their ancestors and pray for a good harvest. The proceedings usually lasted several days.
The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests is built on a tri-level marble terrace and has a blue tile roof with three levels. In 1889 the Hall was struck by lightening and burned to the ground, but it was restored.
The Beijing Natural History Museum is on the western edge of the Temple complex. The museum houses over 5000 pieces - fossils, plants, and animals.
Outside the Temple's east gate is Hong Qiao Market. Among it's offerings are fresh seafood and pearls....
The Number Eleven Thing to Do: See Zhonglou and Gulou -- the Bell Tower and the Drum Tower
North of the lake area, the Bell Tower and the Drum Tower were both built during the reigh of Kublai Khan, in the center of the Yuan capital, Dadu. The current structures were rebuilt under Ming rule. The drums were beat to mark the hour of the closing of the city gates each night.

More thing you can do in China(part02)

 


The Palace's buildings contain over 8700 rooms and halls.
The Palace has been an ongoing work. One building was restored after catching fire as recently as 1987. Most of the buildings date from the 1700's. The Palace was 500 years old before it was opened to the public; the first tourists were allowed to enter it during the 1920's. Nationalist Chinese removed many of the Palace's treasures in 1937 to keep the out of the hands of the Japanese area; in 1949 those treasures were taken to Taiwan.
The Forbidden City's main area is surrounded first by a moat and then by a 35ft high wall. There are four main gates into the walled compound: The Meridan Gate faces south and is the largest of the gates, it accesses the Outer Courtyard; The Gate of the Divine Warrior faces north; two smaller gates, the East Flowery Gate and the West Flowery Gate, also exist. Once inside the walled city though, there are a number of other gates that lead into the various palaces and halls.
A basic map of the walled city is available online.
A few of the more interesting places within the walled city:
  1. Halls of Harmony: Built on a raised marble foundation, the Hall of Supreme Harmony was the tallest building in Beijing during the Ming and Qing dynasties and the biggest of the three Harmony halls. Two bronze tortoises in front of the hall represent longevity. Inside is the Dragon Throne, from where the emperor exercised his authority. The Hall of Middle Harmony was the smallest of the three Harmony halls and was used mostly as a place wher the emperor could prepare to enter the large halls. The Hall of Preserving Harmony was used for New Year's banquets.

  2. Palace of Heavenly Purity: Ming emperors used this building as their sleeping quarters. Qing emperors used it as an audience hall and a state banquet facility. Originally built in 1420, it burnt down several times and the current building goes back to 1798.

  3. Imperial Flower Garden: One of the few pieces of greenery inside the walled compound. The gardenis about 12,000 square meters.The Hall of Imperial Peace stands in the middle of the garden and is guarded by golden unicorns. The garden also contains a pavillion named for each season of the year. And there is a landscaped mountain in the garden with the Pavillion of Imperial View on top of it.

  4. Hall of Union: Potential concubines passed through here to be "approved." Imperial seals are on display in a glass case.

  5. Palace of Earthly Tranquility: Ming emperors granted this building to their wives as the residences of the empress. The Qing emperors also used the building for religious ceremonies that included the sacrifice of four pigs each day.

  6. Hall of Mental Cultivation: China's last emperor, Pu Yi, used this as his personal residence.

  7. Nine Dragons Screen: One of the city's most symbolic edifices.

  8. Imperial Treasury: Includes a display of some of the palace treasures.

  9. Well of the Concubine Zhen: This well is supposed to have become the final resting place of the concubine Zhen Fei in 1898 when Emperoress Cixi had her thrown down it. Cixi and her husband, Guangxu, then fled to Xi'an. How much of this story is history and how much is legend is hard to say...
A few government offices are also housed in the building. There is a 5000 seat banquet hall, a 10,000 seat assembly hall, and some 30 reception rooms named for and styled after a region of China.
The Number Four Thing to Do: Visit the Museum of Chinese History
Also known as the National Museum of China. The museum dates to before Communism came to power, being founded in 1926. Over 5,500 objects are on display out of a collection of 300,000. Included: the fossilized remains of the Beijing Man, painted pottery and jade wares of the Neolithic Age, 3000-year-old Shang Dynasty bronze ware, and Song Dynasty ceramics. At the time of this writing the Museum was promoting an exhibit on Chinese Tea Wares, an collection from the art works of the Inner Mongolia that included over 200 pieces, and an exhibit from the He Chuangshi Fund for Calligraphy.
The Museum of the Chinese Revolution is nearby and focuses on the history of the Communist Party in China.
...
The Number Five Thing to Do: Visit Sun Yatsen Park
South of the Imperial Palace, the park was originally the site of a temple. Sun Yatsen was a leader of the 1911 revolution that brought an end to the Manchu Dynasty. The park was named for him in 1928. Cypress trees grace the park. A white marble arch in the park was originally used to mark the spot where Germany's ambassador was assassinated during the Boxer rebellion in 1900; it was moved to the park in 1919.
...
The Number Six Thing to Do: Visit Jing Shan (Coal Hill)
North of the Imperial Palace, this hill gives a good view of the Palace grounds and some of the surrounding area. A great spot to take pictures from...

More thing you can do in China

 


Beijing is the most visited of China's cities and attractions. It offers enough in itself to fill up most vacations to China. This feature is designed to give you a brief glimpse of some of many things you can see or do in Beijing...
The Number One Thing to Do: See the Imperial Palace.
Even before the Ming Dynasty reestablished Beijing China's official capital in 1421, they began building the Gugong -- the Imperial Palace, more often called the Forbidden City. The emperor Yongle began construction in 1406, using plans that, according to legend, were given to him by a Taoist priest sent from Heaven. The project occupied some 200,000 workers for about 14 years. Many of the Palace's buildings were named for important ideas from Confucian philosophy. It was, after all, the home of the Son of Heaven (as the Chinese Emperor was known).
The Palace's buildings contain over 8700 rooms and halls.
The Palace has been an ongoing work. One building was restored after catching fire as recently as 1987. Most of the buildings date from the 1700's. The Palace was 500 years old before it was opened to the public; the first tourists were allowed to enter it during the 1920's. Nationalist Chinese removed many of the Palace's treasures in 1937 to keep the out of the hands of the Japanese area; in 1949 those treasures were taken to Taiwan.
The Forbidden City's main area is surrounded first by a moat and then by a 35ft high wall. There are four main gates into the walled compound: The Meridan Gate faces south and is the largest of the gates, it accesses the Outer Courtyard; The Gate of the Divine Warrior faces north; two smaller gates, the East Flowery Gate and the West Flowery Gate, also exist. Once inside the walled city though, there are a number of other gates that lead into the various palaces and halls.
A basic map of the walled city is available online.
A few of the more interesting places within the walled city:
  1. Halls of Harmony: Built on a raised marble foundation, the Hall of Supreme Harmony was the tallest building in Beijing during the Ming and Qing dynasties and the biggest of the three Harmony halls. Two bronze tortoises in front of the hall represent longevity. Inside is the Dragon Throne, from where the emperor exercised his authority. The Hall of Middle Harmony was the smallest of the three Harmony halls and was used mostly as a place wher the emperor could prepare to enter the large halls. The Hall of Preserving Harmony was used for New Year's banquets.

  2. Palace of Heavenly Purity: Ming emperors used this building as their sleeping quarters. Qing emperors used it as an audience hall and a state banquet facility. Originally built in 1420, it burnt down several times and the current building goes back to 1798.

  3. Imperial Flower Garden: One of the few pieces of greenery inside the walled compound. The gardenis about 12,000 square meters.The Hall of Imperial Peace stands in the middle of the garden and is guarded by golden unicorns. The garden also contains a pavillion named for each season of the year. And there is a landscaped mountain in the garden with the Pavillion of Imperial View on top of it.

  4. Hall of Union: Potential concubines passed through here to be "approved." Imperial seals are on display in a glass case.

  5. Palace of Earthly Tranquility: Ming emperors granted this building to their wives as the residences of the empress. The Qing emperors also used the building for religious ceremonies that included the sacrifice of four pigs each day.

  6. Hall of Mental Cultivation: China's last emperor, Pu Yi, used this as his personal residence.

  7. Nine Dragons Screen: One of the city's most symbolic edifices.

  8. Imperial Treasury: Includes a display of some of the palace treasures.

  9. Well of the Concubine Zhen: This well is supposed to have become the final resting place of the concubine Zhen Fei in 1898 when Emperoress Cixi had her thrown down it. Cixi and her husband, Guangxu, then fled to Xi'an. How much of this story is history and how much is legend is hard to say...

Are possible Look Great wall In one day?

 


This it’s the step …
  1. Begin as early as possible at the front desk of your hotel, or at any information desk where someone speaks English. The idea is to hire a cab driver for the day.

  2. On your hotel's business card, have someone write write "Great Wall at Badaling Pass, cable car entrance" and "Forbidden City, Shenwu Gate" in Chinese characters.

  3. Have your translator scribble down the negotiated price plainly with the instructions.

  4. Allow about two hours to get to Badaling Pass. Pay your driver about one-third of his fee so he or she can buy lunch.

  5. Look for the "cable car entrance", pay the fee and board the car to the top of the Great Wall.

  6. Savor the view from every angle possible. You have several hours.

  7. Find your driver, who will proceed back into Beijing traffic and drop you at the Forbidden City's Shenwu Gate. Dismiss your driver after paying the remaining fee.

  8. Walk through the Imperial Garden, the Hall of Heavenly Purity and the Hall of Supreme Harmony. Leave the Forbidden City, and cross the bazaar.

  9. Walk Tiananmen Square, then hire a rickshaw driver to show you Beijing's rush hour traffic up close.

  10. Show a new cab driver your hotel card. Be sure it's the side with the hotel's name and address.
Tips:
  1. This day can be accomplished for between $60-130 USD. Share the ride with others if possible to save money.

  2. Remember time is money on this day. The cable car trip saves you time climbing that can be used elsewhere.

  3. This list is only for people with ONE day in Beijing. These magnificent sites deserve much more time if possible